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25 shocking things more likely to kill you than a shark

25 shocking things more likely to kill you than a shark

Cows are 40 times more likely to kill you than a shark. Photo: clipart.com

You don’t have to see the movie Jaws to know that sharks are terrifying, deadly creatures, but how dangerous are they really? On average, there is less than one shark-attack death every two years in the United States, according to records.

In honor of Shark Week, check out 25 things that are much more likely to kill you.

#1 – Stoplight Intersections

Traffic lights are responsible for about 2,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Well, we assume from people running through them, not the lights themselves.

Traffic Red Light


#2 – Coconuts

Falling coconuts cause about 150 deaths annually. You know, while you were keeping an eye on the sharks.

Coconuts


#3 – Mosquitoes

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes kill about 800,000 people every year.

Mosquito


#4 – High School/College Football

High school and college football injuries claim an average of 12 lives annually.

Football


#5 – Champagne Corks

Believe it or not, champagne corks kill almost 24 people each year. Don’t be a show off. Safety first.

Champagne Cork


#6 – Tripping

Almost 6,000 die from tripping and falling at home each year.

Tripping


#7 – Lunch

Choking on food is the cause of about 3.000 deaths each year.

Choking


#8 – Raw Meat

Approximately 5,000 people die each year in the U.S. alone as a result of consuming uncooked, contaminated food.

Raw Meat


#9 – Cows

Cows cause the death of about 20 Americans each year, mostly from blunt-force trauma. Think about that the next time you enjoy a glass of milk.

Cow


#10 – Wind

104 people were killed in wind related incidents including hurricanes, and tornadoes claimed 70 lives in the U.S. in 2012.

Hurricane


#11 – Bees

Bee stings kill about 100 people in the U.S. every year.

Bees


#12 – Horses

Horses kill about 20 people annually in the U.S. alone.

Horses


#13 – The Cold

About 600 people are killed in the U.S. each year from excessively cold weather.

Winter Cold


#14 – Ladders

Falls from ladders cause about 355 deaths annually in the U.S. Another reason not to walk under them.

Ladder


#15 – Hot Tap Water

In the U.S., about 100 people die annually from being scalded by hot tap water. Patience people, patience!

Hot Water


#16 – Ants

Ants kill up to 50 people every year. If you get bit by one fire ant, you’d better run.

Ants


#17 – Dogs

About 30 U.S. deaths are caused by dogs. Not these dogs, but you get the idea.

Dogs


#18 – Icicles

Falling icicles kill about 15 people in the U.S. each year. Chance of being injured increases with the use of a Red Ryder BB Gun.

Icicles


#19 – Autoerotic Asphyxiation

As many as 1,000 people die annually by asphyxiating themselves in this way.

Rope


#20 – Hippos

Hippos claim the lives of 2,900 people around the world each year. You’ll never play Hungry Hungry Hippos the same way again.

Hippos


#21 – Being Left-Handed

Some claim that 2,500 deaths are caused every year when left-handed people attempt to use products designed for right-handed people. While we can’t confirm that statistic it is true that left-handed people are five times more likely than right-handers to die in accidents.

Left Handed


#22 – Lightning

24,000 people are killed by lightning worldwide each year.

Storm Lightning


#23 – Vending Machines

37 people were killed trying to get a snack from a vending machine from 1978 to 1995. That’s an average of 2.18 deaths a year, making this cause of death WAY more likely than shark attacks.

Vending Machine


#24 – Jellyfish

Jellyfish can claim the lives of up to 40 people each year.

Jellyfish


#25 – Beds

450 people die falling out of beds in the United States each year. A real life nightmare.

Sleeping Bed


BONUS – Sharknado

We’re not sure if these should count as regular shark attacks but it’s worth it to note that Syfy’s TORNADO OF SHARKS killed 16 people. So, it could be argued that you’re more likely to be killed by a Sharknado, than an average shark.

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