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Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer angers soccer fans

Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer angers soccer fans

ANGERS FANS: Red Hot Chili Peppers' drummer Chad Smith angered Brazil's Flamengo fans. Photo: Associated Press

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Chad Smith, the drummer for rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers, has apologized to Flamengo fans after he caused outrage in Brazil by wiping his backside with the club’s shirt.

Smith made the gesture – which was filmed and went viral on the internet – at a drum clinic in Belo Horizonte last week.

The band played there as part of a South American tour, before moving on to Rio, home to Flamengo, where they played on Saturday evening.

Fans of Flamengo, who claim to be the best-supported club in Brazil with more than 30 million fans, were outraged by the incident and forced Smith to quickly backtrack.

“I want to apologize for my inappropriate antics at the drum clinic, my joke about team rivalries went too far,” Smith said on Twitter. “Flamenco (sic) fans…I’m sorry.”

Smith then donned a Flamengo shirt and posted a picture of himself signing autographs for Flamengo fans.

He also met with players from the club and presented them with Red Hot Chili Peppers T-shirts.

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