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New children’s book answers ‘What does the fox say?’

New children’s book answers ‘What does the fox say?’

WHAT DOES THE FOX SAY? : Brothers Vegard, center, and Bard Ylvisaker, known as Ylvis (ILL-vis), who elevated the woodland creature in their video, "The Fox (What Does the Fox Say?)," in early September. Photo: Associated Press

foxbook
This book cover image released by Simon & Schuster shows “What Does the Fox Say,” by Ylvis and illustrated by Svein Nyhus. The book, by the Norwegian comedy team Ylvis, is based on the popular YouTube video.

Wacky comedy duo Ylvis have signed a deal to turn their unlikely hit “The Fox (What does the fox say?)” into a children’s book.

The Norwegian brothers, Vegard and Bard Ylvisaker, originally recorded the tune and made an accompanying video to prank TV bosses, but the track has become a chart-topping sensation.

The promo has racked up 213 million YouTube hits – and now the siblings are set to become authors thanks to the catchy hit.

WATCH: “The Fox”

Officials at U.S. publishing house Simon & Schuster signed the brothers to adapt their catchy lyrics into a book, titled “What Does the Fox Say?”

Ylvis’ first book will hit shelves on Dec. 10.

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