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Devo launch crowd-funding campaign to pay for Casale tribute album

Devo launch crowd-funding campaign to pay for Casale tribute album

DEVO: In this 1978 photo, the band Devo, from left, Mark Mothersbaugh, Bob Mothersbaugh, kneeling, Jerry Casale, Bob Casale and Alan Myers pose for a photo. Photo: Associated Press/AP Photo/Devo Inc., Janet Macoska

Punk-pop veterans Devo have launched a crowd-funding initiative to help them release a new live album.

The group staged a 10-date tour in June to raise funds for guitarist Bob Casale’s family following his sudden death in February, and now Casale’s bandmate brother Jerry is hoping fans will help the stars raise the cash needed to complete a live album recorded at a show in Oakland, California.

Many of the tracks the band performed were recorded in the mid-1970s, and had not been played in almost 40 years.

Devotees who pre-order “Devo Hardcore Live!” via the group’s PledgeMusic page will receive exclusive access to photos, video and audio tracks, as well as merchandise.

Jerry Casale tells Rolling Stone, “It (Casale’s death) was a horrific shock and an explosion in the Devo universe. For a month or so, nobody talked about anything. But then we realised we could still do the tour, make it a memorial to Bob and raise money.”

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