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Billy Joel begins Madison Square Garden residency

Billy Joel begins Madison Square Garden residency

BILLY JOEL: The rocker announced his residency late last year. Photo: Associated Press

JOHN CARUCCI, Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Billy Joel has begun his residency at Madison Square Garden with an energetic show that covers a wide swath of his musical catalog.

Joel and his band came out to thunderous applause Monday night and launched into “Miami 2017,” a song Joel wrote in the early 1970s about post-apocalyptic New York City.

Throughout his set, he covered many of his signature songs, as well as a few more obscure tracks.

The Grammy Award-winning icon announced in December that he will perform at the famed New York City venue every month for as long as New Yorkers demand.

He’s set to perform sold-out shows until September with more being added later in the year. His next show is on Monday.

His May 9 show commemorates his 65th birthday.

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